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I think this article written by the official Poweramp dev? This actually makes sense now that you think about it. Apple puts a lot of restriction on their devices and OS. I am afraid even if someone tries to create something like Poweramp/a port of it for iOS, it would just be an "wrapped"/"themed" version of their stock music player framework and even worse. Like how Chrome on iOS is based on WebKit shit rather than Chromium. 

Edited by Someguyonline
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I guess it boils down to two things (apart from the workload aspect):

1) Technically, iOS doesn't provide a lot of the necessary low-level access to its firmware/hardware which Poweramp uses. This makes it more secure of course, but less able.

2) The iOS philosophy, and user expectation, is generally for everything to be spoon-fed to the user. You don't need to set much up, or tweak little things to exactly the level you want - you just use what's given to you, in the way the device presents it to you. This Is The Apple Way, and just have to learn to like it. Poweramp's design philosophy is exactly the opposite. Sure, you can still use it "out of the box", but there are hundreds of little tweaky settings to make it look and work exactly the way you want. Even something as simple as being able to access the device's file storage system from your computer via a USB cable (and thus copy music and other files back and forth to whichever folder locations you choose) is almost impossible with a regular iPhone other than via iTunes, yet this has been a staple function of Android from the start.

Andre

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3 hours ago, andrewilley said:

I guess it boils down to two things (apart from the workload aspect):

1) Technically, iOS doesn't provide a lot of the necessary low-level access to its firmware/hardware which Poweramp uses. This makes it more secure of course, but less able.

2) The iOS philosophy, and user expectation, is generally for everything to be spoon-fed to the user. You don't need to set much up, or tweak little things to exactly the level you want - you just use what's given to you, in the way the device presents it to you. This Is The Apple Way, and just have to learn to like it. Poweramp's design philosophy is exactly the opposite. Sure, you can still use it "out of the box", but there are hundreds of little tweaky settings to make it look and work exactly the way you want. Even something as simple as being able to access the device's file storage system from your computer via a USB cable (and thus copy music and other files back and forth to whichever folder locations you choose) is almost impossible with a regular iPhone other than via iTunes, yet this has been a staple function of Android from the start.

Andre

Well summarized Andre :)

4 hours ago, Someguyonline said:

I think this article written by the official Poweramp dev? This actually makes sense now that you think about it. Apple puts a lot of restriction on their devices and OS. I am afraid even if someone tries to create something like Poweramp/a port of it for iOS, it would just be an "wrapped"/"themed" version of their stock music player framework and even worse. Like how Chrome on iOS is based on WebKit shit rather than Chromium. 

I agree :)

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I suggest a unified top pinned topic on the whole "Poweramp for iOS" with all new and old posts on this subject matter then merged into pinned topic. Indeed it's a very popular request on this forum.

I feel bad for the 'restricted' iOS users, but in the reverse, iOS users must feel bad for us 'fragmented' Android users.

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4 hours ago, andrewilley said:

I guess it boils down to two things (apart from the workload aspect):

Head on the nail!

The "iTunes" environment is just a pain, heavily sandboxed and most of the music players on iOS is using the iTunes library and my understanding is that these apps are restricted to the api's provided by Apple so the players are very limited in functionality and therefore I would almost dare to say that they are more or less just skins.

Then there are some players that are more like Android players and doesn't relay on the iTunes framework. I have actually managed to find a way to download music from a network file share to my iPhone and play it! I also have an USB flash memory that is recognized by the iPhone and can be used to copy files to the phone. It took a while to find a combo that worked...

The common thing for all players that I have dealt with on iOS is that they all suck... for iTunes managed framework I actually use three different players in order to get a somewhat decent user experience.

Either way, it's a pain for someone used to the freedom of Android and Windows/Linux to deal with the locked down i environment.

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