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    • andrewilley

      Poweramp v3 Project Update   04/24/2017

      As you may be aware, the Poweramp developer has been working hard on an updated material design user interface for Poweramp v3 which required a full ground-up rebuild of the code. It is hoped this will be ready for final beta-testing by the end of the May/early June. See forum thread for more details and to discuss.    

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Found 2 results

  1. Recently I got a Maceton WM4BE Bluetooth receiver which supports AptX. On my Sony Xperia Z5 with Poweramp (version 2.0.10 build 588) the sound quality is very good but with other apps (Sony music player, Spotify, YouTube) it sounds too loud and crackles quite a bit. I've checked my Sony audio settings and even changed to safe mode, but apps other than Poweramp still sound bad... So I'm wondering exactly what Poweramp does differently to Bluetooth audio compared to other apps? Has anyone had similar experience with the Xperia Z5? Turning Bluetooth DVC on increases the volume in Poweramp, but it doesn't add any more distortion. I don't have any other Bluetooth devices to test, but I did try the receiver on my older phone (HTC Butterfly s) which also supports AptX. There is sometimes crackling when I switch tracks (which might be a problem on HTC since I recall the same thing happening with wired devices) but the sound quality is otherwise fine.
  2. Like the dozens of enthusiastic people asking for DLNA support, I want to stream from a portable device (a tablet I purchased solely to be a Poweramp dedicated mp3 player) to my stereo. It is possible that Bluetooth, not DLNA, is the answer. As interested readers know, DLNA is a wireless standard capable of the transmission of audio from portable devices to WiFi receivers at CD levels of fidelity. Poweramp does not support DLNA, but some people have succeeded in connecting it to Audio Cast via BubbleUPnP in a rooted phone. (I have succeeded in doing that with an HP Touchpad running Cyanogenmod and Android KitKat, but this setup does not work acceptably for me because, even without wireless transmission, Poweramp stops playing every few hours, which does not meet my needs. And, yes, I have turned off all the likely features causing this such as gapless processing and fading.) I want to make a system that works on a Dell tablet with Android/KitKat. To use Poweramp in this case requires rooting the tablet. This I have been unable to do, and do not want to do because it is not sustainable through OS updates. Also, my WiFi seems to occasionally cause another trial system I am using (n7player using Toaster Cast) to stop playing every few hours or less, despite careful reconfiguration of the channel used by the WiFi router to avoid interference with the DLNA machine that is configured as another network. So I am anxious to try the Bluetooth alternative. Bluetooth has an available bit rate well in excess of the bit rate of any mp3 files--it is about 1 MB/s, while mp3s usually go no higher than 320 kb/s. So if the transmitter (Poweramp and the Dell tablet) is willing to send the mp3 files, and the receiver is willing to receive them, Bluetooth should be good. What we need is 1) a Bluetooth standard that supports this concept, 2) a Bluetooth receiver that supports it, and 3) Poweramp, combined with my tablet, that supports it. Bluetooth does support it. I am pretty sure that most $20 Bluetooth receivers do not, but I have found at least two that do: Nyrius Songo HiFi Wireless Bluetooth aptX Music Receiver ($50) and Audioengine B1 ($190). There is an article that addresses the issue but suggests that Poweramp and my tablet will not do their part in this coordination: You may be familiar with prolific and well-respected audio journalist Brett Butterworth. He wrote, "If both the source device (your phone, tablet or computer) and the destination device (the wireless receiver or speaker) support a certain codec, then material encoded using that codec does not have to have the extra layer of data compression added. Thus, if you're listening to, say, a 128 kbps MP3 file or audio stream, and your destination device accepts MP3, Bluetooth does not have to add an extra layer of compression, and ideally results in zero loss of quality. However, manufacturers tell me that in almost every case, incoming audio is transcoded into SBC, or into aptX or AAC if the source device and the destination device are aptX or AAC compatible." You can find the whole article here: Comparing AirPlay, Bluetooth, DLNA, Play-Fi, Sonos and More Comparing AirPlay, Bluetooth, DLNA, Play-Fi, Sonos and M... A comparison of AirPlay, Bluetooth, DLNA, Play-Fi and Sonos wireless audio technologies View on stereos.about.com Preview by Yahoo The reasons why include adding beeps for your phone, and using the volume control on the phone or tablet...to say nothing of the equalizer available in Poweramp. In Poweramp promotional material here: http://powerampapp.com/features/ ...is the inference that the audio can stay in mp3 form even as Poweramp runs its equalizer. Under the "Equalizer and Tone" heading is this: "works for any supported format and for bluetooth A2DP headset" (A2DP is the transmission standards that deal with negotiating format between the transmitter and the receiver). So, my questions are: 1. Is the transmission of Bluetooth signals a function of the operating system or the app or both? 2. Can, or does, Poweramp act to allow direct transmission of mp3 files from the player via Bluetooth to a compatible receiver?